Quality engraving and personalised gifts including tankards, hipflasks, goblets, jewellery, wedding rings, trophies, glassware, plaques, house signs and more...
Keys cut to code including church keys, cylinder keys, mortice keys, Abloy, Chubb and Abus Plus keys


Tel: 07789 584686  |  E: info@oxfordengraver.com

Your basket: 0 items, £0.00

Hip Flasks

Most items can be purchased with/without engraving of your choice.

If you don't see the items you require here, please call us on 07789 584686 , or email info@oxfordengraver.com and we will be happy to help.

Hip flasks were traditionally made of pewter, silver, or even glass, though most modern flasks are made from stainless steel. Some modern flasks are made of plastic as to avoid detection by metal detectors.

Hip flasks can vary in shape, although they are usually contoured to match the curve of the wearer's hip or thigh, for comfort and discretion. Some flasks have "captive tops" which is a small arm which attaches the top to the flask to stop it from getting lost when it's taken off.

A hip flask is most commonly purchased, and then filled by the owner. However, the term "flask" also applies to smallest bottle sizes of alcohol in commercial markets. Some flasks come with small cups to make sharing easier, although generally liquid is drank directly from the flask. 

The hip flask began to appear in the form recognized today in the 18th century, initially used by members of the gentry. However, less compact versions had been in production for several centuries. Notably, in the Middle Ages, there are several accounts of gutted fruit being used to store liquor. During the 18th century, women boarding docked British warships would smuggle gin into the ship via makeshift flasks, created from pig's bladders and hidden inside their petticoats. Following the act of prohibition in 1920s America, the state of Indiana banned the sale of cocktail shakers and hip flasks.

In the Royal Air Force, "hip-flask" was used as code for a revolver.